You may be surprised to hear about the Swiss cheese plant, primarily because of its unique name and appearance. However, the Swiss cheese plant refers to a few different types of monstera houseplants, given the way that the leaves grow on this beauty. Full of holes and deep green in color, the monstera adansonii is a great houseplant to consider bringing into your home. 

In this article, we will go over what exactly defines a Swiss cheese plant as well as how to take care of one. We will go over the water, light, and soil requirements of this particular house plant, as well as the common problems you may face if you choose to bring one into your home. Let’s get started and talk all about the monstera adansonii now! 

What Is a Swiss Cheese Plant?

Swiss cheese plant
The monstera adansonii is the second most popular monstera variety.

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Defining what a Swiss cheese plant is can be confusing. This is because there are a few different types of monstera plants that are called Swiss cheese plants. However, the primary cultivar that is referred to as the Swiss cheese plant has to be the monstera adansonii. The leaves of this particular monstera have circular holes distributed throughout its foliage, while other monstera varieties have split leaves and other unique designs. 

You technically aren’t wrong if you choose to call any monstera cultivar Swiss cheese plants, as the name is used interchangeably. However, for simplicity’s sake, we will be talking about the care of the monstera adansonii today, arguably the second most popular monstera cultivar found in homes around the world! 

Swiss Cheese Plant Care: Keeping This Monstera Happy

swiss cheese plant
Any Swiss cheese plant, no matter which cultivar you have, comes from a tropical region that thrives in warm weather with ample humidity.

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Whether you already own a monstera plant or plan on purchasing one for a sunny corner of your house, here’s how to best keep this particular houseplant happy. While this care guide could likely apply to other monstera cultivars, keep in mind that this article is specifically about the monstera adansonii. 

Water Requirements

Any Swiss cheese plant, no matter which cultivar you have, comes from a tropical region that thrives in warm weather with ample humidity. The water requirements for your monstera adansonii include consistently moist soil without drenching it, as too much water will lead to root rot and other problems. 

The best test to see whether or not it is time to water your monstera is to feel the soil, roughly an inch deep. If everything feels moist or damp, then your plant is happy. However, any dryness up to an inch down means that it is time to water. You can also keep your monstera or Swiss cheese plant happy if you utilize daily misting or a humidifier in the room where your plant is kept. 

Light Requirements

swiss cheese plant
If you want a large and impressive monstera adansonii, you should aim for a pH level of 5-7 for the most impressive leaves!

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Most people purchase a monstera plant for its leaves, and the Swiss cheese plant is no exception. However, these leaves are delicate and prefer bright, indirect light. While you should make sure that your plant gets at least six to eight hours of sunlight a day, make sure that it isn’t directly burning your leaves. The monstera adansonii typically grows in the underbrush of trees and other plants in its natural habitat, so it is used to feeling the gentle heat from indirect light. 

Soil Requirements

Most Swiss cheese plants aren’t very picky about their soil requirements, but a mixture of classic houseplant potting soil and peat potting mix will help retain moisture indoors. If you want a large and impressive monstera adansonii, you should aim for a pH level of 5-7 for the most impressive leaves! 

Fertilizer or Food Requirements

You don’t necessarily need to fertilize your Swiss cheese plant, especially after you first plant it. However, if you want a larger, more impressive plant or are perhaps concerned about the soil you potted it in to begin with, you can use a basic houseplant fertilizer monthly, so long as you dilute it efficiently. Otherwise, your monstera adansonii is happy in the indirect sunshine with plenty of water! 

Common Problems and Pests of Swiss Cheese Plants

swiss cheese plant
You don’t necessarily need to fertilize your Swiss cheese plant, especially after you first plant it.

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Like all houseplants, keeping an eye out for pests and common issues is always a good idea. Thankfully, most Swiss cheese plants are strong enough to bounce back should anything happen to them. However, just in case, here’s a list of the most common issues that may happen with your monster adansonii:

  •  Root rot and overwatering. Over-watering is a possible killer for any monstera plants, and you can tell whether or not this is happening by the state of its leaves. Root rot is the number one killer of most houseplants, so if you notice your monstera leaves turning yellow, it’s time to cut back on the watering or repot. 
  • Spider mites and mealy bugs. Common pests for any type of houseplant can be treated with certain sprays and treatments. You can even find an insecticide that isn’t toxic to kids and animals, keeping them and your monstera adansonii safe!
  • Blackened leaves. If you notice that your monstera adansonii is unhappy, particularly if it has blackened or dark and leaves, it may be getting too much direct sunlight. Most monstera plants are easy to relocate without much fuss, so be sure to do this if you think that your Swiss cheese plant leaves are changing for the worse! 

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